A4 Conference proceedings

A novel application of Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) sensors in MPGD


Open Access publication


Publication Details

Authors: Tuuva Tuure, Talvitie J., Abbaneo D, Abbas M., Abbrescia M., Abi Akl M., Aboamer O., Acosta D., Ahmad A., Ahmed W., Aleksandrov A., Altieri P., Asawatangtrakuldee C., Aspell P., Assran Y., Awan I., Bally S., Ban Y.,
Banerjee S., Barashko V. , Barria P., Bencze G., Beni N., Benussi L., Bhopatkar V., Bianco S.

Publisher: EDP Sciences: EPJ Open Access / EDP Sciences

Publication year: 2018

Language: English

Related journal or series: EPJ Web of Conferences

Volume number: 174

ISSN: 2101-6275

eISSN: 2100-014X

JUFO level of this publication: 1

Digital Object Identifier (DOI): http://dx.doi.org/10.1051/epjconf/201817403002

Open Access: Open Access publication


Abstract

We present a novel application of Fiber Bragg Grating (FBG) sensors in the construction and characterisation of Micro Pattern Gaseous Detector (MPGD), with particular attention to the realisation of the largest triple (Gas electron Multiplier) GEM chambers so far operated, the GE1/1 chambers of the CMS experiment at LHC. The GE1/1 CMS project consists of 144 GEM chambers of about 0.5 m2 active area each, employing three GEM foils per chamber, to be installed in the forward region of the CMS endcap during the long shutdown of LHC in 2108-2019. The large active area of each GE1/1 chamber consists of GEM foils that are mechanically stretched in order to secure their flatness and the consequent uniform performance of the GE1/1 chamber across its whole active surface. So far FBGs have been used in high energy physics mainly as high precision positioning and re-positioning sensors and as low cost, easy to mount, low space consuming temperature sensors. FBGs are also commonly used for very precise strain measurements in material studies. In this work we present a novel use of FBGs as flatness and mechanical tensioning sensors applied to the wide GEM foils of the GE1/1 chambers. A network of FBG sensors have been used to determine the optimal mechanical tension applied and to characterise the mechanical tension that should be applied to the foils. We discuss the results of the test done on a full-sized GE1/1 final prototype, the studies done to fully characterise the GEM material, how this information was used to define a standard assembly procedure and possible future developments.


Last updated on 2019-13-03 at 12:00